Category Archives: Environment

5RP Central Queensland University

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Social Influences on Problem Gamblers
  • Are You Getting Enough?  Sex as a Natural Hypnotic.

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics from the host Central Queensland University present their research.  Dr Alex Rusell works as a post doctoral fellow with a focus on gambling research, which he discusses in “Social Influences on Problem Gamblers”.  Dr Michele Lastella teaches in the Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, where he continues to research covering sleep, stressors, psychological impacts and performnace, some of which you will hear about in his talk, “Are You Getting Enough? Sex as a Natural Hypnotic”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Alex Rusell

Alex has a background in psychology, completing his PhD in 2014 in the School of Psychology at the University of Sydney where he studied taste and smell perception, with a specific interest in wine perception. During that time he also conducted research into odour-colour synaesthesia.

Towards the end of his PhD, Alex started working in gambling research which led to a position in the Centre for Gambling Education and Research at Southern Cross University.  He now  works as a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at CQUniversity, with a focus on gambling research. His specific interests in the area of gambling are: the impact of new technologies (Internet, mobile devices) on gambling behaviours and related harms; gambling amongst minority groups, such as Indigenous people; and methodological issues in gambling research.


 

 

 

 

Dr Michele Lastella

Michele completed an Honours degree in Psychology in 2009 at the University of the Sunshine Coast and a PhD in Psychology in 2015 at the Appleton Institute for Behavioural Sciences. During this time he became active in sleep research. His research interests involved examining the sleep/wake behaviours of elite athletes and how various stressors may impact their psychological state and performance. In 2016, he took up a full-time teaching and research position at the Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science and continues conducting research in the area of pre-sleep behaviours, sleep, mood and performance.


CONGRATULATIONS

Alex Russell placed third in the Science and Health discipline. Michele Lastrealla placed second in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences discipline.


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

5RP University of Southern Queensland

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car
  • A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics from the University of Southern Queensland present their current research.  Dr Adina Piovesana from the School of Psychology and Counselling has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.  Her talk is entitled “Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car”.  Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander from the School of Health and Wellbeing typically researches in the workplace and has a particular interest in fostering healthy behaviours in shift workers, which she considers in her talk “A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Adina Piovesana

Dr Piovesana, a lecturer in ethics in psychology and psychological assessment, has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.

“Research has indicated that the force of a tackle is similar to hitting the windscreen of a car travelling at 40km per hour, so I thought that was an emotive and clear way to get the message across in my pitch.  While there are current protocols and tools used when dealing with concussions in sports, they aren’t sensitive enough to capture the cognitive and psychological effects concussions are having on players, and there is no consistency across the different sporting codes that I’ve been able to identify.  Unfortunately we don’t really know the long-term effects of concussions so we need to continue research that looks at it in more detail.  Adina will continue her research on psychometrics, test development and standardisation, and sports-related concussion.


 

 

 

 

Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander

Tracy is a senior lecturer at USQ’s School of Health and Wellbeing, her research is examining the effects shift work can have on the body, looking at the role of physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours on the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases such as heart disease.  “Shift workers are often time poor, have disruptive patterns and find it hard to fit in physical activity. My research is looking at ways to bring physical activity to shift workers with the hope they become more active, less fatigued, have an improved sense of wellbeing and most importantly a reduced risk of heart disease.”


CONGRATULATIONS

Dr Adina Piovesana and Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander have both returned with titles from the 5 Minute Research Pitch national final.  The researchers won their respective disciplines.  Southern Queensland University Executive Dean (Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts) Professor Barbara de la Harpe (middle) celebrates at the finals with the winners.

MORE CONGRATULATIONS

You may have noticed Adina has two trophies. She was voted the overall winner at the final in Melbourne. This gives the University of Southern Queensland the hosting rights for the 5 Minute Research Pitch 2018.

Here she receives the award from the Vice Chancellor of CQU, Professor Scott Bowman, who said he’d been impressed by the strong field of researchers.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

5RP University of Tasmania

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Flavonoids – Rich Food For Thought
  • Understanding how International Law can Govern Negative Emissions

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED


Two academics from the University of Tasmania pitch very different projects. Dr Katherine Kent from the Centre for Rural Health ressearches flavonoids and cognition and asks us to consider “Flavonoids – Rich Food For Thought”.  Dr Kerryn Brent from the Faculty of Law considers present “Undersanding how International Law can Govern Negative Emissions.


 

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Kent

Katherine Kent (nee Caldwell) is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Centre for Rural Health. Katherine has a background in nutrition and public health and is interested in the field of nutrition, cognition and ageing. Specifically, Katherine is involved in research that investigates the impact of fruit flavonoids on cognitive and physical outcomes, especially in older adults with dementia. Katherine is also interested in evaluating and improving current methods that estimate dietary flavonoid intake.


Kerryn Brent photo

 

 

 

 

Dr Kerryn Brent

Kerryn’s research has been focused on international law and governance in regard to the new global technologies, such as geoengineering, that are increasingly being considered as part of the broader discourse around global climate responses.  In this talk she addresses the role that international law can play in governing negative emissions.


CONGRATULATIONS

A People’s Choice Award, voted by audience members at CQUni Melbourne, and via a webcast, went to Dr Katherine Kent.  In addition Katherine took second place in the Science and Health Discipline.  Dr Kerryn Brent placed third in the Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences discipline.


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

Camels, Places and People

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Camels, Places & People
  • Assembling perspectives in the environment

Camels provide an unlikely perspective to view the Australian environment, but human geographer Leah Gibbs is interested in people and places.  Her work questions the notion of “feral”, “introduced” and “invasive” species, and rather confronts the situation from an assemblage perspective.  Taking the wider view, incorporating the narrative of all stakeholders, including non-human species and their contributions, provides a starting point to challenge simplistic dualistic thinking.

I talk to Leah Gibbs about her work in Camel country, the analysis of camel assemblages and the way this approach challenges a simplistic narrative of invasive species.

 

FEATURED

leahgibbsDr Leah Gibbs is a human geographer and Senior Lecturer in Geography in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities and the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research [AUSCCER] at the University of Wollongong.

 

AUDIO

Bruce Miller, Camel Guide Song 2 [field recording]
Scott Holmes, Breathe New Life
Scott Holmes, Chasing Shadows
Scott Holmes, Mother Nature

PUBLICATION

Camel country: Assemblage, belonging and scale in invasive species geographies

 

Jellyfish: Aliens, Assassins or Adventurers

 

 

 

  • Producer : Michael Schubert
  • Jellyfish: Aliens, Assassins or Adventurers

Jellyfish are a poorly understood member of “the other 99%” as the invertebrates are known. A simple creature, floating, stinging eating, and breeding en masse. Jellyfish blooms are sometimes huge, exceeding 1,000 km in length, and it’s completely natural.

Blooms occur worldwide and to some it seems they are becoming more prevalent, or perhaps they are now being monitored more closely. Immense blooms compromise fisheries, sinking boats and destroying captive breeding pens. The also enter industrial sites using seawater intake for cooling – air conditioning plants, desalination plants, nuclear plants and nuclear aircraft carriers. All have fallen victim to jellyfish.

How big, how bad and why? Michael Schubert talks with Lisa Gershwin aka Dr Jellyfish.

FEATURED

Dr Lisa Gershwin

ARTICLES

Current Oriented Swimming by Jellyfish

MUSIC

Koop Jellyfishes
Deya Dova – Jellyfish

 

Graffiti, street art, crime and creative cities

 

 

 

  • Producer : Dallas Rogers
  • Graffiti, Street Art, Crime and Creative Cities

What is the difference between graffiti and street art? Is one artistic form a crime and the other a reputable creative practice?

Emerging in North America in the 1960s, graffiti crossed the Pacific with hip-hop and break dancing in the 1980s.

Australian governments have long classified graffiti as a form of vandalism. Many cities have adopted tough legal measures to deter graffiti artists from tagging walls and trains.

The city of Hobart recently “declared a war” on graffiti. But other cities have begun to value and promote another form of public artistic practice, street art – effectively a legal form of graffiti.

We talk to Cameron McAuliffe about the new cultural and economic value of street art, and how many of the older graffiti artists have transitioned to street art to capitalise on the idea of the creative city.

FEATURED

Dr Cameron McAuliffe is a Lecturer in Human Geography and Urban Studies. He researchers the relationship between graffiti and street art, and the value of these art forms to the economies of our cities.

AUDIO

Ten NEWS New Graffiti Laws
Free Music Archive Highlights by Kris Anderson
Free Music Archive Hotel Rodeo ft. DSpliff by Anitek
Free Music Archive Contact by mo-seph

Seasons of Change : Nature vs Calendars

 

 

 

  • Producer : Michael Schubert
  • Seaasons of Change: Nature vs Calendars

Seasons are more than just the changes in weather, ecology and hours of daylight caused by the Earth’s rotation around the sun and the gentle tilt of the Earth’s axis.  Astronomers and meteorologists are at odds, and in Australia the conventional “Vivaldi” seasons are found wanting.  Seasons affect people and people, plants and animals are intimately connected with their own seasonal understanding.

I speak with Professor Tim Entwisle, Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Victoria and author of Sprinter and Summer : Australia’s Changing Seasons.  He has considered the natural biological responses of plants in particular and proposed, as a discussion paper, the inclusion of an additional “season” into our horticultural calendar.

Dr John Ryan from Edith Cowan University is an environmental philosopher and considers that an understanding of the indigenous weather calendar is essential to a deeper understanding of all disciplines in particular localities.  He has followed the development of the Indigenous Weather Knowledge Project by the Bureau of Meteorology, a compilation of indigenous seasonal calendars around Australia.

FEATURED

  • Professor Tim Entwisle – Director of Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria (formerly of Kew Gardens and RBG Sydney)
  • Dr John Ryan – Environmental Philosopher at Edith Cowan University (Perth)
  • Bureau of Meteorology Indigenous Weather Knowledge Project

AUDIO

Music from AudioBlocks royalty free library