Category Archives: History

5RP Charles Sturt University

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Addressing Falls Risk in Regional Australia: Do We Need to Rethink our Approach?
  • The bride of the sky: The implications of the “aurus” for the Egyptian Tentmakers

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Queensland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

 

In this episode we feature two academics from Charles Sturt University.  Kristy Robson researches risk management and approaches to rehabilitation after falls and Sam Bowker ponders the implication of the appliqued “aurus” for Egyptian Tentmakers,  then and now.


 

 

 

 

Dr Kristy Robson
Kristy Robson lectures in the School of Podiatry and her research interests in include injury risk management and falls in rural settings.


 

 

 

 

Dr Sam Bowker

Dr Sam Bowker is a Lecturer in Art History and Visual Culture at Charles Sturt University.  His current major research project is an art historical survey of Khayamiyya, or Egyptian Tentmaker Applique, from the late Ottoman Empire to the present. This has resulted in exhibitions around Australia and for the Islamic Art Museum Malaysia, which hosts an annual scholars-in-residence program for CSU students.


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

Old Husband’s Tales

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Old Husbands’ Tales : Businesswomen in Sydney 1850-1950

Using modern digital archives to look back into our colonial history, Catherine Bishop found that women in early Australia were far more than merely ‘colonial helpmeets’ supporting their settler husbands. Many colonial women in both Australia and New Zealand were engaged in earning a living. Often this involved starting a small business – as a dressmaker or publican, grocer or theatrical entrepreneur – or inheriting an enterprise from a dead husband – such as an ironmongery, butcher’s shop or jewellery business.

FEATURED

Dr Catherine Bishop is a historian who researches Australian, New Zealand and international history, with a particular focus on women.   She received a PhD from the Australian National University in 2012 and is now a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow at the University of Sydney.

She has published a number of articles and her first book Minding Her Own Business: Colonial Businesswomen in Sydney was published in October 2015. This book was awarded the 2016 Ashurst Business Literature Prize. She has contributed to the Dictionary of Sydney. She was the Australian Religious History Fellow at the State Library of New South Wales in 2016. She was also the recipient of a New Zealand History Trust Award and won the Australian Women’s History Network Mary Bennett prize.

Her research interests include businesswomen in New Zealand and Australia, female missionaries, the International Federation of Business and Professional Women and the Daily Mail and Herald Tribune World Youth Forums of the post World War Two era. She is also interested in heritage, particularly in the way women’s history has been memorialised.

AUDIO

Alex Fitch, Mile Post 1
Alex Fitch, Celeste
Audioblocks royalty free stock music.

PUBLICATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Click image for more information on the book.
Inside History magazine interview

HELP WITH CATHERINE’S RESEARCH

Catherine is looking for people with knowledge of women in business in Australia from 1880-1980.
Contact Catherine


TROVE

 

 


Trove is a collaboration between the National Library, Australia’s State and Territory libraries and hundreds of cultural and research institutions around Australia, working together to create a legacy of Australia’s knowledge for now and into the future.

EPISODE TITLE

The title was inspired by an article by Leonore Davidoff  entitled Regarding Some Old Husbands’ Tales: Public and Private in Feminist History [in Worlds Between: Historical Perspectives on Gender and Class, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995].


 

Female Chinese Australians: A Feminist Tale of Multiculturalism

 

 

 

  • Producer: Dallas Rogers
  • Female Chinese Australians: A Feminist Tale of Multiculturalism

Stella Sun is a Chinese Australian woman who was born on Thursday Island in 1931. Stella travelled to mainland Australia when she was 17 years old. Dr Alanna Kamp has been interviewing women like Stella about their experiences of belonging and exclusion as female Chinese Australians during the White Australia Policy era.

The women Alanna is interviewing piece many memories together to tell rich stories about migration, settlement and family. In this episode, Dallas talks to Alanna about researching Chinese Australian women during the White Australia period. He learns she is putting these women front and centre of her research to produce a feminist reading of about the birth of Australian multiculturalism.

FEATURED

F1000007-Edit-2Alanna Kamp (BA BSc (UNSW); PhD (WSU)) is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Urban Research Program/School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University (WSU). As an historical and cultural geographer, Alanna is interested in feminist and postcolonial understandings of the migrant experience and attitudes to immigration in Sydney. She is particularly interested in the ways in which historical geographies of migrant experience have contemporary relevance and shape current community experiences and identities. Alanna is also a member of the Challenging Racism Project at WSU.

Recent publications include:

The virtues and challenges of comparative analyses of immigration, migrant settlement and transnationalism (2015)

Chinese Australian women in White Australia: utilising available sources to overcome the challenge of “invisibility” (2013)

A failed political attempt to use global Islamophobia in Western Sydney: the ‘Lindsay leaflet scandal’ (2012)

Formative Geographies of Belonging in White Australia: Constructing the National Self and Other in Parliamentary Debate, 1901 (2010)

Indigenous Australians’ Attitudes Towards Multiculturalism, Cultural Diversity, ‘Race’ and Racism (2010)

The hopeful and exclusionary politics of Islam in Australia: looking for alternative geographies of ‘Western Islam’ (2009)

siobhan

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Thanks,
Michael

FEATURED

Dr Siobhan McHugh is a Senior Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Wollongong, Australia. Siobhan is an internationally recognised award-winning writer, oral historian and broadcaster, whose work over three decades has been concerned with capturing and transforming marginalised voices through the affective power of sound and storytelling.

She has written social histories, authored over 60 radio documentaries and created oral history archives on themes ranging from society and culture to war, history and the environment, which are held at the National Library of Australia, State Library of New South Wales and City of Sydney.

Siobhan’s practice-based and practice-led research straddles industry and the academic world. Her creative work has won the NSW Premier’s Award for Non-Fiction and gold and bronze awards at the New York Radio Festival and been shortlisted for the UN Media Peace Prize (Australia), the NSW Premier’s History Prize, and a Walkley Award for Excellence in Journalism. Siobhan’s theoretical research interests include the evolution and impact of audio storytelling and podcasting, critical analysis of the radio documentary/feature form, orality and aurality in oral history and the affective power of voice.

She is founding editor of RadioDoc Review, the first scholarly journal dedicated to critical analysis of the crafted audio feature/podcast form and is a member of the editorial board of The Radio Journal: International Studies in Broadcast and Audio Media and a peer reviewer for US-based journal Oral History Review, where her article, The Affective Power of Sound: Oral History on Radio is among the journal’s most cited. It has been included in the third edition of the Routledge Oral History Reader considered the most significant anthology of international oral history scholarship.

Siobhan’s research interests include:

  • Radio documentary and podcasting studies
  • Critical analysis of audio storytelling
  • Oral history interviewing as inter-subjective dialogue
  • Long-form narrative journalism studies
  • Orality and aurality in oral history
  • Audio as vector for affect and emotion

AUDIO

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PUBLICATIONS : PDF

The Aerobic Art of Interviewing, from the Asia Pacific Media Educator
How Podcasting is Changing the Audio Storytelling Genre, from Researchgate
Audio Storytelling; Unlocking the Power of Audio to Inform,  Empower and Connect, from Researchgate

PUBLICATIONS : LINKS

Why S-Town invites empathy not voyeursim, on The  Conversation
The Power of Voice
, on transom website
Audio Storytelling and the Affective Power of Voice, on the Wheeler Centre website
The Power of Podcasting, on myndset

WWW LINKS

Siobhan McHugh website
RadioDoc Review website