Category Archives: Management

hamstrings

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Eccentric Hamstrings, Big Sport
    and Pioneering Research Groups


Many of us have had a hamstring injury at one time or another – you know – that big muscle group at the back of the thigh.  Sportspeople are constantly injuring that muscle group at great cost to themselves and the team.  David Opar and his team research, collaborate and coordinate the new wave of inquiry into hamstring injury, rehabilitation and management.

FEATURED

Dr David Opar completed his doctoral thesis at the Queensland University of Technology [QUT] in the area of hamstring strain injuries. Soon after its completion he joined the Australian Catholic University [ACU] as a Lecturer in the School of Exercise Science.

David is part of the ACU High Performance Sport lecturing team and manages the ‘Performance and Injury: Prevention and Management’ unit. He also heads up the ACU Hamstring Injury Group and is leading the way in hamstring injury research. David and his team are in close consultation with professional sporting codes both nationally and internationally to deliver evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies for their athlete group.

AUDIO

David Krayb, 50 cm bag
Barcelona vs Real Madrid Messi injured 2017, excerpt.
Audioblocks licensed music.

PUBLICATIONS – PDF

Hamstring Strain Injuries: Factors that Lead to Injury and Re-Injury, in Sports Medicine.
Eccentric Hamstring Strength and Hamstring
Injury Risk in Australian Footballers, in Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise
Short biceps femoris fascicles and eccentric knee
flexor weakness increase the risk of hamstring
injury in elite football (soccer): a prospective
cohort study, in the British Medical Journal
Running exposure is associated with the risk of
hamstring strain injury in elite Australian footballers, in the British Medical Journal

YOUTUBE PRESENTATIONS

Hamstring Injuries in detail

Five years of Research in 25 minutes

LINKS

 

 

 


5RP University of Southern Queensland

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car
  • A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics from the University of Southern Queensland present their current research.  Dr Adina Piovesana from the School of Psychology and Counselling has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.  Her talk is entitled “Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car”.  Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander from the School of Health and Wellbeing typically researches in the workplace and has a particular interest in fostering healthy behaviours in shift workers, which she considers in her talk “A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Adina Piovesana

Dr Piovesana, a lecturer in ethics in psychology and psychological assessment, has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.

“Research has indicated that the force of a tackle is similar to hitting the windscreen of a car travelling at 40km per hour, so I thought that was an emotive and clear way to get the message across in my pitch.  While there are current protocols and tools used when dealing with concussions in sports, they aren’t sensitive enough to capture the cognitive and psychological effects concussions are having on players, and there is no consistency across the different sporting codes that I’ve been able to identify.  Unfortunately we don’t really know the long-term effects of concussions so we need to continue research that looks at it in more detail.  Adina will continue her research on psychometrics, test development and standardisation, and sports-related concussion.


 

 

 

 

Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander

Tracy is a senior lecturer at USQ’s School of Health and Wellbeing, her research is examining the effects shift work can have on the body, looking at the role of physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours on the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases such as heart disease.  “Shift workers are often time poor, have disruptive patterns and find it hard to fit in physical activity. My research is looking at ways to bring physical activity to shift workers with the hope they become more active, less fatigued, have an improved sense of wellbeing and most importantly a reduced risk of heart disease.”


CONGRATULATIONS

Dr Adina Piovesana and Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander have both returned with titles from the 5 Minute Research Pitch national final.  The researchers won their respective disciplines.  Southern Queensland University Executive Dean (Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts) Professor Barbara de la Harpe (middle) celebrates at the finals with the winners.

MORE CONGRATULATIONS

You may have noticed Adina has two trophies. She was voted the overall winner at the final in Melbourne. This gives the University of Southern Queensland the hosting rights for the 5 Minute Research Pitch 2018.

Here she receives the award from the Vice Chancellor of CQU, Professor Scott Bowman, who said he’d been impressed by the strong field of researchers.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

5RP Victoria University

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Right Place, Right Time, with the Right Eye Watching: Talent Identification and Recruitment in Team Sports.
  • Giving Voice to the Silent Game

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules. Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories:  Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences.  The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner.  You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research.  It takes preparation and precision.  You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own.  In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics who research sport from different perspectives in the College of Sport & Exercise Science  at Victoria University. Dr Paul Larkin is interested in how talent is identified in early career sports people.  Dr Fiona McLachlan discusses the “silent game”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Paul Larkin

Talented sportspeople need to be spotted, identified, supported, trained and educated.  So how is this achieved?  Dr Paul Larkin’s research investigates the methods of spotting and recruitment.  Given the money invested at the leading edge of sport, you’d think it would be methodical, that “talent scouts” would have it down to a fine art or science.  You’d assume that they were finding the best of the best and that chance, personal bias and serendipity had no place in the process.  Well, think again, as you listen to “Right Place, Right Time, with the Right Eye Watching”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Fiona McLachlan

Fiona started exploring the historical and social perspectives of a sport that has one of the highest participation rates across all sports – netball.  What she found was very little, given the dominance of this sport in all parts of Australia.  There was little record of it’s existence compared to the minutiae of details, records and memorabilia from other notable Australian sports. She enlisted citizen researchers to fill the void as she coordinates the social history of netball in Victoria, in her talk, “Giving Voice to the Silent Game”.


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

 

 

 

Camels, Places and People

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Camels, Places & People
  • Assembling perspectives in the environment

Camels provide an unlikely perspective to view the Australian environment, but human geographer Leah Gibbs is interested in people and places.  Her work questions the notion of “feral”, “introduced” and “invasive” species, and rather confronts the situation from an assemblage perspective.  Taking the wider view, incorporating the narrative of all stakeholders, including non-human species and their contributions, provides a starting point to challenge simplistic dualistic thinking.

I talk to Leah Gibbs about her work in Camel country, the analysis of camel assemblages and the way this approach challenges a simplistic narrative of invasive species.

 

FEATURED

leahgibbsDr Leah Gibbs is a human geographer and Senior Lecturer in Geography in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities and the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research [AUSCCER] at the University of Wollongong.

 

AUDIO

Bruce Miller, Camel Guide Song 2 [field recording]
Scott Holmes, Breathe New Life
Scott Holmes, Chasing Shadows
Scott Holmes, Mother Nature

PUBLICATION

Camel country: Assemblage, belonging and scale in invasive species geographies

 

Listen: Stop Doing So Much Work

 

 

 

  • Producer : Michael Schubert
  • Listen: Stop Doing So Much Work
  • Hearing Lessons for Creative Research

Focusing on work rather than thinking gets in the way of innovative research and collaboration, says David McAlpine. David heads a communication research group, The Hearing Hub and he walks his own talk. Collaborating with researchers, not for profits and corporate partners, he is demonstrating a new model for outcome-based research. With a focus on improving the communication experience over the lifetime, he’s worth listening to.

There are two narratives in this story. First, The Hearing Hub is a multidisciplinary collaborative research centre located within a university. The centre collaborates with academic, not for profit, government and corporate stakeholders. Making this model work, without compromising the research outcomes, is a major accomplishment for The Hearing Hub and its Director. The second narrative is a compelling ‘call to action’. David asks us to consider new paradigms of research; incorporating diverse members of the research community as well as the beneficiaries of the research. It is a model based on quality not quantity, creativity and rigour, and it is an approach that is not tied to the publish or perish imperative that drives many contemporary research centres.

FEATURED

DavidMcAlpineProfessor David McAlpine is Macquarie University’s Director of Hearing Research at the Australian Hearing Hub and is a 2016 Australian Laureate Fellow by the Australian Research Council (ARC). Dr McAlpine joined Macquarie University in 2015, after a decade as the Professor of Auditory Neuroscience at University College London and Director of the UCL Ear Institute.

He says that communication is a vital aspect of what it means to be human, and hearing is critical to communication. His research interests span neural modeling, methods for recording individual neurons in the brain, as well as brain-imaging and electrophysiology in normal and hearing-impaired listeners, including those who use cochlear implants. The outcomes of this research could help to improve our understanding of how we naturally perform these remarkable feats, with potential applications in how we can restore the ability in individuals who have lost their hearing and rely on hearing devices to hear.

ahh logoMQ_INT_HOR_RGB_POS

 

 

AUDIO

 

Climate Change – Personal Experience Catalyses Acceptance & Motivation

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Climate Change – Personal Experience Catalyses Acceptance and Motivation

Climate change is more than changing weather patterns, sea level rises and catastrophic events.  Dr Joseph Reser points out it is the psychological impacts on individuals of this ongoing stressor and how they will manage their psychological responses and lifestyle options that are the most important factors, yet which are receiving little attention in policy decisions and planning. Are you psychologically prepared?

The ongoing and profound threat of climate change is here and now, affecting quality of life and environment, mental health and well-being, and how people feel about and respond to environmental issues. There is a crucial need to be effectively documenting, and monitoring these psychological impacts as well as taking action to address them.”
Joseph Reser

FEATURED

josephreserJoseph Reser is a Professor in the School of Applied Psychology at Griffith University and an Emeritus Reader at the University of Durham in England. He is a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society and a member of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Psychology and Climate Change. Joseph was  also the lead researcher on a recent National Climate Change Adaptation Response Facility (NCCARF)-funded research program addressing public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change and natural disasters in Australia.

He is also a contributing author to the most recent [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] IPCC Report and a just released U.S. government interagency report, The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States. Joseph is a U.S. trained environmental and social psychologist with a long term involvement in human response to environmental threat.

AUDIO

Sarah Farnsworth, The World Today, 30 April 2015, Climate change report warns of health impacts
Michael Edwards, The World Today, 8 March 2016, Climate change could bring more rain to desert areas
Michael Bressenden, The World Today, 22 September 2015, Defence under-prepared for climate change security threat
Simon Lauder,  The World Today, 22 March 2016, World Meteorological Organization warns of unprecedented climate change
Tony Blair [AP Archives], Former UK PM Blair urges world leaders to deal with Climate Change
Al Gore [Guardian Interviews], Climate change deniers won’t win

Alex Fitch, We Call This Home III [Free Music Archive]
Alex Fitch, Milepost 1 [Free Music Archive]
Sound effects AUDIOBLOCKS

FURTHER READING

REPORTS

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2014) IPCC Fifth Assessment Report Climate Change 2014: Impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (AR5): Contributing author to Chapter 25, Australasia. Reisinger, A., Kitching, R., et al. Geneva, Switzerland: IPCC Secretariat.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L., Glendon, A.I., Ellul, M.C. & Callaghan, R. (2012) Public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change and natural disasters in Australia: 2010-2011 national survey findings. Gold Coast, Qld: National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility.

Dodgen, D., Donato, D., Dutta, T., Kelly, N., La Greca, A., Morganstein, J., Reser, J.P., Ruzek, J., Schweitzer, S. & Shimamoto, M. (2015) Mental health and well-being. In U.S. National Climate Assessment/U.S. Global Change Research Program US Global Change Research Program (USCGRP) Climate and Health Assessment: Interagency special report on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. Washington, DC: U.S. National Climate Assessment/U.S. Global Change Research Program. In press.

CHAPTERS

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, M.C. (2015) Public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change. In J. Palutikof, S. Boulter, J. Barnett, & D. Rissik (Eds) Applied studies in climate adaptation (pp 43-50). Chichester, England: Wiley-Blackwell.

Bradley, G. L., Reser, J. P., Glendon, A. I., & Ellul, M. C. (2014). Distress and coping in response to climate change. In K. Kaniasty, Buchwald, P., Howard, S., & Moore, K. (Eds.), Stress and anxiety. Applications to social and environmental threats, psychological wellbeing, occupational challenges, and developmental psychology (pp. 33-42). Berlin: Logos Verlag.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, M.C. (2012) Coping with climate change: Bringing psychological adaptation in from the cold. In B. Molinelli & V. Grimaldo (Eds) Handbook of the psychology of coping: Psychology of emotions, motivations and actions (pp 1-34). New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Reser, J.P., Morrissey, S.A. & Ellul, M. (2011) The threat of climate change: Psychological response, adaptation, and impacts. In I. Weissbecker (2011) (Ed) Climate change and human well being (pp 19-42). International and Cultural Psychology Series. New York: Springer Publications.

ARTICLES

Reser, J.P. (2015) Coming to terms with climate change: The multiple benefits of psychological preparedness and taking action. The Dialogue, 11 (2) 4-5.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, .C. (2014) Encountering climate change: ‘Seeing’ is more than ‘Believing’ Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 5 (4) 521-537. Doi:1002/wcc.286

Hine, D.W., Reser, J.P., Phillips, W., Cooksey, R., Nunn, P., Morrison, M. (2014) Audience segmentation and climate change communication: Conceptual and methodological considerations. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 5 (4) 441-459.

Reser, J.P. (2012) What does ‘belief’ in climate change really mean? The Conversation, 10 August, 2012.

Reser, J.P. & Swim, J. (2011) Adapting to and coping with the threat and impacts of climate change. American Psychologist, 66 (4) 277-289.

Swim, J., Clayton, S., Doherty, T., Gifford, R., Howard, G., Reser, J., Stern, P. & Weber, E. (2011) Psychological contributions to understanding and addressing global climate change. Special issue. American Psychologist, 66 (4) 241-328.

Reser, J.P. (2011) Polls, framings and public understandings: Climate change and opinion polls. The Conversation, 1 July, 2011.  

Reser, J.P. (2011) Australia and climate change – Beliefs about public belief may be quite wrong, The Conversation, 9 June 2011. 

Factory Farming and Urban Planning

factory farm

 

 

 

  • Executive Producer : Dallas Rogers
  • Producer : Elizabeth Taylor
  • Factory Farming and Urban Planning: Killing Two Million Birds With One Zone
Dr Liz Taylor

Australians consume over 600 million chickens each year. The vast majority are grown in intensive, vertically integrated factory farming operations called ‘broiler’ farms – some of which house over a million chickens at any one time. While many of us can barely imagine what a million chickens in a shed might look or smell like, peri-urban and rural communities often have firsthand experience. Australians consume a lot of cheap chicken, but planning conflicts show not everyone appreciates an intensive chicken factory as a neighbour. Factory farms are a frequently polarising form of agriculture.

In this episode, SoundMinds Radio producer Liz Taylor visits the Victorian town of Castlemaine near a growing cluster of contentious large-scale commercial chicken farms. One recent proposal has seen over two years of planning dispute and may result in Supreme Court action. Liz speak with La Trobe Bendigo researcher Dr Andrew Butt about his research into rural land use planning issues and the pressures of the increasing scale of agricultural systems. Liz also speaks to a local resident who leads a local group concerned about the local impacts intensive farms.

This is a story about how urban planning works in rural areas. As intensive agriculture increases in scale, it causes planning conflicts and places pressures on established practices and regulations. Urban planning comes from an urban tradition, and typically the theories used for thinking about the rural and the urban divide can be quite blunt. ‘Farms’ go in rural zones. But if 21st century farming looks like a million chickens in a shed, a ‘factory’ farm, certainty about what a farm is and where it belongs becomes clouded. Andrew discusses the challenges for planning systems and the risks of trying to close down political discussions about the ethics and impacts of factory farming.

FEATURED

Dr Elizabeth Taylor, RMIT University – Producer

Elizabeth is a Vice Chancellor’s Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the Centre for Urban Research at RMIT University. Her interests are in policy-focused research across urban planning, housing markets, property rights and locational conflict and her research often makes use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). An increasing research focus is car parking policy. Elizabeth’s publications have explored the housing market implications of urban containment policies; the contested role of research in planning practice; and the ‘Not in My Back Yard’ (NIMBY) phenomenon. The latter includes food, waste and animal-based land uses – like intensive chicken farms – that expose contradictions in the distribution of rights associated with production and consumption.

Dr Andrew Butt, La Trobe University

Dr Andrew ButtDr Andrew Butt is a Senior Lecturer at La Trobe University with over 20 years practical experience in planning practice, education and research. He has a strong teaching and research interest in rural landscape change and the interaction of planning systems and agricultural restructuring, particularly in peri-urban areas. His research and practice has involved analysis of farmland change, developing scenarios for land development in rural areas and work on the promotion of local food systems. He has also been involved in policy development and research in the areas of intensive farming and land use conflict with a focus on planning systems and practice.

AUDIO

The Taylor Project: Animals [courtesy of Liz Taylor, used with permission]

IMAGE

Courtesy AnonHQ.com

Climate Change – Coming Ready or Not

 

 

 

  • Michael Schubert
  • Climate Change – Coming Ready or Not

bennewellProfessor Ben Newell is an ARC Future Fellow and Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of New South Wales. He is also an Associate Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Climate System Science. He’s particularly interested in judgement and decision-making, with particular interest in the cognitive mechanisms underlying the decisions we make. He is co-author of the book Straight Choices: The Psychology of Decision Making.

He recently coauthored an article in Nature Climate Change, reporting on an experiment he did on the decision making challenges facing people when confronted with catastrophic events like tsunamis or bushfires. The research indicated, counterintuitivley, that rare disaster information can increase risk-taking.

AUDIO

Audio samples, Audioblocks
The World Today, Tropical Cyclone Winston: Reaching Affected Communities A Big Challenge.
The World Today, Shock turns to anger as Yarloop residents push for reconstruction of town destroyed by fire.
ABC Ballarat, 10-year-old Gippsland boy’s dramatic telephone call reveals bravery under fire.
ABC Ballarat, Carngham couple reflects on fire six months after losing everything.

IMAGE

NASA Goddard Space Flight, Sunset Over Earth.

 

 

 

 

When Festivals Go Wrong

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • When Festivals Go Wrong

You know what it’s like.  You’ve saved for months and queued for hours just to buy the ticket.  It’s a big event, a festival, big for you and logistically bigger for the organisers.  When the bands are great, or the sport is incredible or the religious experience is humbling, life is good.  That’s when festivals go right, but sometimes festivals go wrong.  Like the Love Parade in 2010 in Germany; the Cambodian Crush or the Hajj Pilgrimage in 2015 – people die.

To anticipate and prevent such tragedy the Event Manager is part engineer; part psychologist; part sociologist; and a human resources manager capable of micro managing as well as seeing the big picture.  And all without the participants knowing it is even happening.

Michael Schubert talks with Dr Peter Wynn-Moylan, of Southern Cross University, who is currently writing the book on Event Management.

FEATURED

Dr Peter Wynn-Moylan

AUDIO

Kai Engel: Between Nothing and Everything
Kai Engel: Curtains Are Always Drawn
Podington Bear: Floating in Space

ABC World Today: Hundreds Killed in Bridge Stampede
ABC MId North Coast
: Learning The Lessons of The Love Parade
ABC AM: 717 Deaths in Hajj Pilgrimage

Seasons of Change : Nature vs Calendars

 

 

 

  • Producer : Michael Schubert
  • Seaasons of Change: Nature vs Calendars

Seasons are more than just the changes in weather, ecology and hours of daylight caused by the Earth’s rotation around the sun and the gentle tilt of the Earth’s axis.  Astronomers and meteorologists are at odds, and in Australia the conventional “Vivaldi” seasons are found wanting.  Seasons affect people and people, plants and animals are intimately connected with their own seasonal understanding.

I speak with Professor Tim Entwisle, Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Victoria and author of Sprinter and Summer : Australia’s Changing Seasons.  He has considered the natural biological responses of plants in particular and proposed, as a discussion paper, the inclusion of an additional “season” into our horticultural calendar.

Dr John Ryan from Edith Cowan University is an environmental philosopher and considers that an understanding of the indigenous weather calendar is essential to a deeper understanding of all disciplines in particular localities.  He has followed the development of the Indigenous Weather Knowledge Project by the Bureau of Meteorology, a compilation of indigenous seasonal calendars around Australia.

FEATURED

  • Professor Tim Entwisle – Director of Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria (formerly of Kew Gardens and RBG Sydney)
  • Dr John Ryan – Environmental Philosopher at Edith Cowan University (Perth)
  • Bureau of Meteorology Indigenous Weather Knowledge Project

AUDIO

Music from AudioBlocks royalty free library