Category Archives: Psychology

Don’t Feed The Trolls

Producer: Michael Schubert
Don’t Feed The Trolls :
The Dark Side of Social Media

Social media has a dark side, and the emergence of trolls and their behaviours and motivation has fascinated Dr Evita March.  Is it just a case of the “dark personality traits” or could there be more to the story?  Trolls are different to cyber-bullies, they are unknown, untrackable and unfortunately unavoidable.  And there is very little research.  Evita and her colleauges are on a troll hunt, seeking to find out more.

FEATURED

Dr Evita March is a lecturer and researcher in psychology at Federation University, Melbourne, Australia.  Evita’s areas of research expertise include mate preferences, personality, and online behaviours.

She is currently involved in research exploring predictors of online antisocial behaviours and mate strategies.  Evita is a member of the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists [SASP], and is currently the Deputy Group Administrator for the Federation University Sex Gender and Relationships Research Interest Group.

AUDIO

Ars Sonor, Rgrdlzz
Ars Sonor, Lostfrevr
Ars Sonor, Waiting
Ars Sonor, Prcsse
RN, Twitter trolls excerpt, Sept 11, 2012.
RN, Charlotte Dawson : Lifeline support excerpt, Feb 24, 2014

PUBLICATION – PDF

The dark side of Facebook®: The Dark Tetrad, negative social potency, and trolling behaviours.

 

 

 

 

Coaching the Coach


Producer: Michael Schubert
Coaching the Coach

Scott Talpey moved from the US to Australia and discusses his dedication to working as an academic and informing the coaches of the other 99%, that is those who play sport at a non-elite level.  Scott’s early career as a strength and conditioning coach provided him with an understanding of the responsibilities and an insight into the needs of players and coaches.  He discusses the differences in cultural approaches to playing sport between the US and Australia and the role that club-based rather than school and college based participation leads to different outcomes.   The coach is seen as the key to changing the way we play and train for sport in Australia.

FEATURED

Dr Scott Talpey is a lecturer and researcher at Federation University Australia and a Research Associate at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) endorsed Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), at Federation University Australia.  His broad research area is in applied sport and exercise science with a specific focus on sports injury prevention and performance with an aim to have the sports coach and athlete as the end user of his research.

Scott is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) and a level II strength and conditioning coach from the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA).  He currently practice as a strength and conditioning coach for semi professional adult and high performance junior basketball players. Scott uses his research background to inform his coaching, and his coaching experience to drive his research.

PUBLICATIONS

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Scott_Talpey/publications

AUDIO

Alex Fitch, We Call This Home III
Podington Bear, Bumble
Other licensed music from Audioblocks.

 

 

Hypermasculinity and Sports


Executive Producer: Dallas Rogers
Producer: Alejandra Villanueva

Hypermasculinity and Sports

We are used to seeing or playing sport without really thinking about the multiple sociocultural factors that take place in the game and on the field. Gina Krone delves into some of the most significant features of the most popular Australian sports. She analyses the concept of hypermasculinity looking at the physicality needed to practice AFL and Rugby, and how the body and minds of athletes have been portrayed and enacted according to different historical periods. In this episode we talk about the pedagogical strategies of the colonial project in Australia, and how globalised sports like Rugby are a useful case study to analyse issues such as masculinity, ethnicity and racism.

FEATURED

Alejandre Villanueva

SONY DSCAlejandra Villanueva is a Cultural Anthropologist, currently doing her PhD at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University.  She’s interested in the significance of sporting practices in contemporary societies, and how by looking at sports we can understand the processes of gender identity construction, socioeconomic inequalities and the social structures that shape the ways in which we understand work and leisure.

Gina Krone

Gina KroneGina Krone is a social researcher currently undertaking her PhD at RMIT exploring sport as cultural practice for diasporic Pasifika communities living in multicultural urban centres in Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand.

 

AUDIO

 

Camels, Places and People


Producer: Michael Schubert
Camels, Places & People
Assembling perspectives in the environment

Camels provide an unlikely perspective to view the Australian environment, but human geographer Leah Gibbs is interested in people and places.  Her work questions the notion of “feral”, “introduced” and “invasive” species, and rather confronts the situation from an assemblage perspective.  Taking the wider view, incorporating the narrative of all stakeholders, including non-human species and their contributions, provides a starting point to challenge simplistic dualistic thinking.

I talk to Leah Gibbs about her work in Camel country, the analysis of camel assemblages and the way this approach challenges a simplistic narrative of invasive species.

 

FEATURED

leahgibbsDr Leah Gibbs is a human geographer and Senior Lecturer in Geography in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities and the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research [AUSCCER] at the University of Wollongong.

 

AUDIO

Bruce Miller, Camel Guide Song 2 [field recording]
Scott Holmes, Breathe New Life
Scott Holmes, Chasing Shadows
Scott Holmes, Mother Nature

PUBLICATION

Camel country: Assemblage, belonging and scale in invasive species geographies

 

Superheroes and Fascism


Producer: Dallas Rogers
Superheroes and Fascism

Superhero films are big business. Avengers: Age of Ultron recently passed US$1 billion in box office sales. The first Avengers film is currently third in all-time box office rankings.

The popularity and success of Batman, Ironman and The Avengers have contributed to a revival of the American superhero on the big screen. And though the latest films may seem like modern superhero narratives, the themes that make them relevant today stretch back to the 1930s and 40s, and the environment that gave rise to the first superheroes: the great depression, an undercurrent of fascism in America, and the looming Second World War.

Dallas Rogers speaks with Jason Dittmer on the continued relevance of superheroes in both popular and political culture, and the influence of fascism and geopolitical forces on the superhero narrative.
Jason Dittmer is the author of Captain America and the Nationalist Superhero: Metaphors, Narratives, and Geopolitics.

AUDIO

Podington Bear: Fathomless
Blue Dot Sessions: Modul Kalimba

In Search of Silence


Producer: Michael Schubert
In Search of Silence

Do you want to hear all about silence? Perhaps silence is simply the absence of sound. Not noise. But is that it? I’m on a quest in search of silence, to explore the views of those who work with sound, and those who deal with silence. The quest will take me to the quietest rooms and the noisiest streets, in search of silence.

I asked the experts, sat in silent rooms and explored a diversity of views. What I found was a range of definitions and a fascination amongst those who work with silence. From hearing and communication researchers to composers, musicians, sound recording engineers and naturalists and acoustic ecologists – they all had their point of view, their lens on silence.

The anechoic chamber, a silent room, rumoured to drive you crazy turned out to be serene, unusual and compelling. Hearing Researchers told me that we don’t hear sounds in our head at all, it’s all electrical currents. Not sound at all. Composers and sound recordists considered silence to be as important as sound. Conductors insist that musicians needed to learn how to play silence in order to create great performances.

I talked with Professor David McAlpine from the Australian Hearing Hub, a researcher who opened the door to the anechoic chamber, Richard Gill, composer, conductor and music educator who is currently exploring how to play silence, and Guntis Sics, who is always on film sets and finds his version of professional silence different to absolute silence.

Does silence exist? Would we want silence if we could actually find it? Will our brain allow silence to exist for us? These are some of the questions posed and answered as I go In Search of Silence.

Visit In Search of Silence for blog posts and interviews.

This piece was made for the CBAA National Features & Documentary Series 2016, a showcase of work by new and emerging Australian community radio producers, with training and mentoring provided by the Community and Media Training Organisation.

Hearing Colours Seeing Sounds


Producer: Michael Schubert
Hearing Colours Seeing Sounds : Lessons from Synaesthesia

We are used to hearing sounds and seeing colours, but what if you could hear colours or see sounds. Or what if you read a book and each letter had a colour. Dr Anina Rich researches synaesthesia with an aim to understand the associating functions in our everyday perception. Although unusual, synaesthesia is not a disorder; it can provide us with a unique view of the integration that underlies perception. Synaesthetics may just be the “pioneers of perception”.

FEATURED

aninarichAssociate Professor Anina Rich has two main streams of research. One explores the way in which the brain prioritises relevant information and ignores distraction – the mechanisms that allow us to pay attention. The other relates to the way the brain integrates information, both across the senses and within a single sense.

Synaesthesia, an unusual condition in which stimulation in one sensory modality generates an additional experience, provides a unique perspective of this integration. For example, in ‘sound-colour’ synaesthesia, a sound elicits a colour experience; in ‘grapheme-colour’ synaesthesia, letters, digits and words each generate particular involuntary colours. Although unusual, synaesthesia is not a disorder. She is currently conducting studies on grapheme-colour, sound-colour, and olfactory-colour synaesthesia.

LINKS

SYNAESTHESIA RESEARCH GROUP at Macquarie University
SYNAESTHESIA Participant Register

AUDIO

Alexandre Navarro, All Around
Mystery Mammal, Lonely Satellite


PAUL BOURKE LECTURE 2014

As part of receiving the prestigious Paul Bourke Award in 2013 from the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, on 1st May 2014 Associate Professor Rich discussed her research on synaesthesia and the mappings we all have between our senses, giving insights into the way the brain integrates information for conscious perception of the world.


McGurk EFFECT

If you haven’t seen it or you’ve seen it a hundred times, it still works.  The McGurk Effect demonstrates how we use visual information when we listen .. what we see … affects .. what we hear.


ORGANISATIONS

ccd_logo

acns0b500

globalyoungacademy

CONFERENCE

neuroscienceconference

Listen: Stop Doing So Much Work

Producer : Michael Schubert

Listen: Stop Doing So Much Work
Hearing Lessons for Creative Research

Focusing on work rather than thinking gets in the way of innovative research and collaboration, says David McAlpine. David heads a communication research group, The Hearing Hub and he walks his own talk. Collaborating with researchers, not for profits and corporate partners, he is demonstrating a new model for outcome-based research. With a focus on improving the communication experience over the lifetime, he’s worth listening to.

There are two narratives in this story. First, The Hearing Hub is a multidisciplinary collaborative research centre located within a university. The centre collaborates with academic, not for profit, government and corporate stakeholders. Making this model work, without compromising the research outcomes, is a major accomplishment for The Hearing Hub and its Director. The second narrative is a compelling ‘call to action’. David asks us to consider new paradigms of research; incorporating diverse members of the research community as well as the beneficiaries of the research. It is a model based on quality not quantity, creativity and rigour, and it is an approach that is not tied to the publish or perish imperative that drives many contemporary research centres.

FEATURED

DavidMcAlpineProfessor David McAlpine is Macquarie University’s Director of Hearing Research at the Australian Hearing Hub and is a 2016 Australian Laureate Fellow by the Australian Research Council (ARC). Dr McAlpine joined Macquarie University in 2015, after a decade as the Professor of Auditory Neuroscience at University College London and Director of the UCL Ear Institute.

He says that communication is a vital aspect of what it means to be human, and hearing is critical to communication. His research interests span neural modeling, methods for recording individual neurons in the brain, as well as brain-imaging and electrophysiology in normal and hearing-impaired listeners, including those who use cochlear implants. The outcomes of this research could help to improve our understanding of how we naturally perform these remarkable feats, with potential applications in how we can restore the ability in individuals who have lost their hearing and rely on hearing devices to hear.

ahh logoMQ_INT_HOR_RGB_POS

 

 

AUDIO

 

Climate Change – Personal Experience Catalyses Acceptance & Motivation

Michael Schubert

Climate Change – Personal Experience Catalyses Acceptance and Motivation

Climate change is more than changing weather patterns, sea level rises and catastrophic events.  Dr Joseph Reser points out it is the psychological impacts on individuals of this ongoing stressor and how they will manage their psychological responses and lifestyle options that are the most important factors, yet which are receiving little attention in policy decisions and planning. Are you psychologically prepared?

The ongoing and profound threat of climate change is here and now, affecting quality of life and environment, mental health and well-being, and how people feel about and respond to environmental issues. There is a crucial need to be effectively documenting, and monitoring these psychological impacts as well as taking action to address them.”
Joseph Reser

FEATURED

josephreserJoseph Reser is a Professor in the School of Applied Psychology at Griffith University and an Emeritus Reader at the University of Durham in England. He is a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society and a member of the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on Psychology and Climate Change. Joseph was  also the lead researcher on a recent National Climate Change Adaptation Response Facility (NCCARF)-funded research program addressing public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change and natural disasters in Australia.

He is also a contributing author to the most recent [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] IPCC Report and a just released U.S. government interagency report, The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States. Joseph is a U.S. trained environmental and social psychologist with a long term involvement in human response to environmental threat.

AUDIO

Sarah Farnsworth, The World Today, 30 April 2015, Climate change report warns of health impacts
Michael Edwards, The World Today, 8 March 2016, Climate change could bring more rain to desert areas
Michael Bressenden, The World Today, 22 September 2015, Defence under-prepared for climate change security threat
Simon Lauder,  The World Today, 22 March 2016, World Meteorological Organization warns of unprecedented climate change
Tony Blair [AP Archives], Former UK PM Blair urges world leaders to deal with Climate Change
Al Gore [Guardian Interviews], Climate change deniers won’t win

Alex Fitch, We Call This Home III [Free Music Archive]
Alex Fitch, Milepost 1 [Free Music Archive]
Sound effects AUDIOBLOCKS

FURTHER READING

REPORTS

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2014) IPCC Fifth Assessment Report Climate Change 2014: Impacts, adaptation and vulnerability (AR5): Contributing author to Chapter 25, Australasia. Reisinger, A., Kitching, R., et al. Geneva, Switzerland: IPCC Secretariat.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L., Glendon, A.I., Ellul, M.C. & Callaghan, R. (2012) Public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change and natural disasters in Australia: 2010-2011 national survey findings. Gold Coast, Qld: National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility.  www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/public-risk-perceptions-second-survey

Dodgen, D., Donato, D., Dutta, T., Kelly, N., La Greca, A., Morganstein, J., Reser, J.P., Ruzek, J., Schweitzer, S. & Shimamoto, M. (2015) Mental health and well-being. In U.S. National Climate Assessment/U.S. Global Change Research Program US Global Change Research Program (USCGRP) Climate and Health Assessment: Interagency special report on the impacts of climate change on human health in the United States. Washington, DC: U.S. National Climate Assessment/U.S. Global Change Research Program. In press.

CHAPTERS

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, M.C. (2015) Public risk perceptions, understandings and responses to climate change. In J. Palutikof, S. Boulter, J. Barnett, & D. Rissik (Eds) Applied studies in climate adaptation (pp 43-50). Chichester, England: Wiley-Blackwell.

Bradley, G. L., Reser, J. P., Glendon, A. I., & Ellul, M. C. (2014). Distress and coping in response to climate change. In K. Kaniasty, Buchwald, P., Howard, S., & Moore, K. (Eds.), Stress and anxiety. Applications to social and environmental threats, psychological wellbeing, occupational challenges, and developmental psychology (pp. 33-42). Berlin: Logos Verlag.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, M.C. (2012) Coping with climate change: Bringing psychological adaptation in from the cold. In B. Molinelli & V. Grimaldo (Eds) Handbook of the psychology of coping: Psychology of emotions, motivations and actions (pp 1-34). New York, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Reser, J.P., Morrissey, S.A. & Ellul, M. (2011) The threat of climate change: Psychological response, adaptation, and impacts. In I. Weissbecker (2011) (Ed) Climate change and human well being (pp 19-42). International and Cultural Psychology Series. New York: Springer Publications.

ARTICLES

Reser, J.P. (2015) Coming to terms with climate change: The multiple benefits of psychological preparedness and taking action. The Dialogue, 11 (2) 4-5.

Reser, J.P., Bradley, G.L. & Ellul, .C. (2014) Encountering climate change: ‘Seeing’ is more than ‘Believing’ Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 5 (4) 521-537. Doi:1002/wcc.286

Hine, D.W., Reser, J.P., Phillips, W., Cooksey, R., Nunn, P., Morrison, M. (2014) Audience segmentation and climate change communication: Conceptual and methodological considerations. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 5 (4) 441-459.

Reser, J.P. (2012) What does ‘belief’ in climate change really mean? The Conversation, 10 August, 2012.  http://theconversation.edu.au/what-does-belief-in-climate-change-really-mean-8746

Reser, J.P. & Swim, J. (2011) Adapting to and coping with the threat and impacts of climate change. American Psychologist, 66 (4) 277-289.

Swim, J., Clayton, S., Doherty, T., Gifford, R., Howard, G., Reser, J., Stern, P. & Weber, E. (2011) Psychological contributions to understanding and addressing global climate change. Special issue. American Psychologist, 66 (4) 241-328.

Reser, J.P. (2011) Polls, framings and public understandings: Climate change and opinion polls. The Conversation, 1 July, 2011.  http://theconversation.edu.au search?q=Reser

Reser, J.P. (2011) Australia and climate change – Beliefs about public belief may be quite wrong, The Conversation, 9 June 2011. http://theconversation.edu.au search?q=Reser

Climate Change – Coming Ready or Not


Michael Schubert

Climate Change – Coming Ready or Not

bennewellProfessor Ben Newell is an ARC Future Fellow and Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of New South Wales. He is also an Associate Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Climate System Science. He’s particularly interested in judgement and decision-making, with particular interest in the cognitive mechanisms underlying the decisions we make. He is co-author of the book Straight Choices: The Psychology of Decision Making.

He recently coauthored an article in Nature Climate Change, reporting on an experiment he did on the decision making challenges facing people when confronted with catastrophic events like tsunamis or bushfires. The research indicated, counterintuitivley, that rare disaster information can increase risk-taking.

AUDIO

Audio samples, Audioblocks

The World Today, Tropical Cyclone Winston: Reaching Affected Communities A Big Challenge.

The World Today, Shock turns to anger as Yarloop residents push for reconstruction of town destroyed by fire.

ABC Ballarat, 10-year-old Gippsland boy’s dramatic telephone call reveals bravery under fire.

ABC Ballarat, Carngham couple reflects on fire six months after losing everything.

IMAGE

NASA Goddard Space Flight, Sunset Over Earth.