Category Archives: Research

Don’t Feed The Trolls

Producer: Michael Schubert
Don’t Feed The Trolls :
The Dark Side of Social Media

Social media has a dark side, and the emergence of trolls and their behaviours and motivation has fascinated Dr Evita March.  Is it just a case of the “dark personality traits” or could there be more to the story?  Trolls are different to cyber-bullies, they are unknown, untrackable and unfortunately unavoidable.  And there is very little research.  Evita and her colleauges are on a troll hunt, seeking to find out more.

FEATURED

Dr Evita March is a lecturer and researcher in psychology at Federation University, Melbourne, Australia.  Evita’s areas of research expertise include mate preferences, personality, and online behaviours.

She is currently involved in research exploring predictors of online antisocial behaviours and mate strategies.  Evita is a member of the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists [SASP], and is currently the Deputy Group Administrator for the Federation University Sex Gender and Relationships Research Interest Group.

AUDIO

Ars Sonor, Rgrdlzz
Ars Sonor, Lostfrevr
Ars Sonor, Waiting
Ars Sonor, Prcsse
RN, Twitter trolls excerpt, Sept 11, 2012.
RN, Charlotte Dawson : Lifeline support excerpt, Feb 24, 2014

PUBLICATION – PDF

The dark side of Facebook®: The Dark Tetrad, negative social potency, and trolling behaviours.

 

 

 

 

Old Husband’s Tales


Producer: Michael Schubert
Old Husbands’ Tales : Businesswomen in Sydney 1850-1950

Using modern digital archives to look back into our colonial history, Catherine Bishop found that women in early Australia were far more than merely ‘colonial helpmeets’ supporting their settler husbands. Many colonial women in both Australia and New Zealand were engaged in earning a living. Often this involved starting a small business – as a dressmaker or publican, grocer or theatrical entrepreneur – or inheriting an enterprise from a dead husband – such as an ironmongery, butcher’s shop or jewellery business.

FEATURED

Dr Catherine Bishop is a historian who researches Australian, New Zealand and international history, with a particular focus on women.   She received a PhD from the Australian National University in 2012 and is now a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow at the University of Sydney.

She has published a number of articles and her first book Minding Her Own Business: Colonial Businesswomen in Sydney was published in October 2015. This book was awarded the 2016 Ashurst Business Literature Prize. She has contributed to the Dictionary of Sydney. She was the Australian Religious History Fellow at the State Library of New South Wales in 2016. She was also the recipient of a New Zealand History Trust Award and won the Australian Women’s History Network Mary Bennett prize.

Her research interests include businesswomen in New Zealand and Australia, female missionaries, the International Federation of Business and Professional Women and the Daily Mail and Herald Tribune World Youth Forums of the post World War Two era. She is also interested in heritage, particularly in the way women’s history has been memorialised.

AUDIO

Alex Fitch, Mile Post 1
Alex Fitch, Celeste
Audioblocks royalty free stock music.

PUBLICATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Click image for more information on the book.
Inside History magazine interview

HELP WITH CATHERINE’S RESEARCH

Catherine is looking for people with knowledge of women in business in Australia from 1880-1980.
Contact Catherine


TROVE

 

 


Trove is a collaboration between the National Library, Australia’s State and Territory libraries and hundreds of cultural and research institutions around Australia, working together to create a legacy of Australia’s knowledge for now and into the future.

EPISODE TITLE

The title was inspired by an article by Leonore Davidoff  entitled Regarding Some Old Husbands’ Tales: Public and Private in Feminist History [in Worlds Between: Historical Perspectives on Gender and Class, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995].


 

Coaching the Coach


Producer: Michael Schubert
Coaching the Coach

Scott Talpey moved from the US to Australia and discusses his dedication to working as an academic and informing the coaches of the other 99%, that is those who play sport at a non-elite level.  Scott’s early career as a strength and conditioning coach provided him with an understanding of the responsibilities and an insight into the needs of players and coaches.  He discusses the differences in cultural approaches to playing sport between the US and Australia and the role that club-based rather than school and college based participation leads to different outcomes.   The coach is seen as the key to changing the way we play and train for sport in Australia.

FEATURED

Dr Scott Talpey is a lecturer and researcher at Federation University Australia and a Research Associate at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) endorsed Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), at Federation University Australia.  His broad research area is in applied sport and exercise science with a specific focus on sports injury prevention and performance with an aim to have the sports coach and athlete as the end user of his research.

Scott is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) and a level II strength and conditioning coach from the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA).  He currently practice as a strength and conditioning coach for semi professional adult and high performance junior basketball players. Scott uses his research background to inform his coaching, and his coaching experience to drive his research.

PUBLICATIONS

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Scott_Talpey/publications

AUDIO

Alex Fitch, We Call This Home III
Podington Bear, Bumble
Other licensed music from Audioblocks.

 

 

Hypermasculinity and Sports


Executive Producer: Dallas Rogers
Producer: Alejandra Villanueva

Hypermasculinity and Sports

We are used to seeing or playing sport without really thinking about the multiple sociocultural factors that take place in the game and on the field. Gina Krone delves into some of the most significant features of the most popular Australian sports. She analyses the concept of hypermasculinity looking at the physicality needed to practice AFL and Rugby, and how the body and minds of athletes have been portrayed and enacted according to different historical periods. In this episode we talk about the pedagogical strategies of the colonial project in Australia, and how globalised sports like Rugby are a useful case study to analyse issues such as masculinity, ethnicity and racism.

FEATURED

Alejandre Villanueva

SONY DSCAlejandra Villanueva is a Cultural Anthropologist, currently doing her PhD at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University.  She’s interested in the significance of sporting practices in contemporary societies, and how by looking at sports we can understand the processes of gender identity construction, socioeconomic inequalities and the social structures that shape the ways in which we understand work and leisure.

Gina Krone

Gina KroneGina Krone is a social researcher currently undertaking her PhD at RMIT exploring sport as cultural practice for diasporic Pasifika communities living in multicultural urban centres in Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand.

 

AUDIO

 

Feet First

Producer: Michael Schubert
Feet First
A tale of science and serendipity

This is a story of science and serendipity, a researcher observing and listening, a story of research unfolding. Karen Mickle moved from researching changes in the feet of children, to older feet, studying falling injuries and ultimately developing exercises based on biomechanical principles. Karen’s research became practically driven as she listened to the reports of her participants, and her current focus is focused on improving the health and fitness of feet in a diabetic population.

FEATURED

Dr Karen Mickle is a postdkaren-mickleoctoral research fellow within the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL) at Victoria University. Her research is located in the Gait, Balance and Falls group within ISEAL’s Clinical Exercise Science Research program.

Karen is a biomechanist who gained her PhD in 2011 from the University of Wollongong and was awarded a prestigious postdoctoral training fellowship (2011-14) from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). Karen’s research for over a decade has focused on applied lower limb biomechanics with a specific interest in structure and function of the foot and the influence of musculoskeletal and metabolic pathologies.

During her NHMRC fellowship, Karen spent two years at the University of Salford, UK. Here she developed a reliable method to measure foot muscle morphology using ultrasound. Karen has published 20 original research articles and three book chapters. She has 40 conference papers at national and international scientific meetings, including the Clinical Biomechanics Award address at the 2009 International Society of Biomechanics Congress, and Invited Speaker presentations at the World Congress of Biomechanics in 2010 and 2014.

Her current research aims to determine the pathomechanics of muscle weakness in individuals who have foot problems, and to develop evidence-based intervention strategies to restore foot function in people with foot disorders [Media Release].

AUDIO

Kai Engel, Between Nothing and Everything
Fabrizio Paterlini, Profondo Blue
Podington Bear, Grebe

IMAGE

© Episode image, Saskia Schubert 2017 with permission

Camels, Places and People


Producer: Michael Schubert
Camels, Places & People
Assembling perspectives in the environment

Camels provide an unlikely perspective to view the Australian environment, but human geographer Leah Gibbs is interested in people and places.  Her work questions the notion of “feral”, “introduced” and “invasive” species, and rather confronts the situation from an assemblage perspective.  Taking the wider view, incorporating the narrative of all stakeholders, including non-human species and their contributions, provides a starting point to challenge simplistic dualistic thinking.

I talk to Leah Gibbs about her work in Camel country, the analysis of camel assemblages and the way this approach challenges a simplistic narrative of invasive species.

 

FEATURED

leahgibbsDr Leah Gibbs is a human geographer and Senior Lecturer in Geography in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities and the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research [AUSCCER] at the University of Wollongong.

 

AUDIO

Bruce Miller, Camel Guide Song 2 [field recording]
Scott Holmes, Breathe New Life
Scott Holmes, Chasing Shadows
Scott Holmes, Mother Nature

PUBLICATION

Camel country: Assemblage, belonging and scale in invasive species geographies

 

Gentrification & The Green Bans


Producer: Dallas Rogers
Gentrification & The Green Bans

In this episode, we take to the streets of Sydney. We meet public housing resident Barney Gardner at his house in the suburb of Millers Point, which is just under Sydney Harbour Bridge.

I’ve spent a bit of time with Barney over the last couple of years, interviewing him for various research projects on inner city gentrification.

Barney was born in Millers Point and has lived there all his life. In 2014, he was told he had to move out of his house and the neighbourhood. The public housing he was living in was being sold off.

For most of the last two centuries Millers Point’s proximity to major wharves and maritime industries saw the place develop as a largely low-income, working class neighbourhood. In the early 1970s the ‘Green Bans’ saved the suburb from modernist redevelopment.

I talk to Nicole Cook, a Lecturer at the University of Wollongong, about urban development in Sydney, and what the Green Bans teach us about Global Sydney.

FEATURED

Dr Nicole Cook is a Lecturer in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities at The University of Wollongong. Nicole is an urban geographer with research interests in urban governance, power and participation, social movement and resident activism, housing and home.

Barney Gardner was born in Millers Point and has lived there all his life.

AUDIO

Blue Dot Sessions, Outside the Terminal
The Kyoto Connection, Close to the Abyss
NSW Parliament, Life time resident Barney Gardner addresses crowd outside NSW Parliament House
Tanya Plibersek, Millers Point Public Housing
Blue Print for Living, Iconic Buildings: Sirius Building
SHFATheRocks, Jack Mundey and the Victory – Part 3 of 3

Superheroes and Fascism


Producer: Dallas Rogers
Superheroes and Fascism

Superhero films are big business. Avengers: Age of Ultron recently passed US$1 billion in box office sales. The first Avengers film is currently third in all-time box office rankings.

The popularity and success of Batman, Ironman and The Avengers have contributed to a revival of the American superhero on the big screen. And though the latest films may seem like modern superhero narratives, the themes that make them relevant today stretch back to the 1930s and 40s, and the environment that gave rise to the first superheroes: the great depression, an undercurrent of fascism in America, and the looming Second World War.

Dallas Rogers speaks with Jason Dittmer on the continued relevance of superheroes in both popular and political culture, and the influence of fascism and geopolitical forces on the superhero narrative.
Jason Dittmer is the author of Captain America and the Nationalist Superhero: Metaphors, Narratives, and Geopolitics.

AUDIO

Podington Bear: Fathomless
Blue Dot Sessions: Modul Kalimba

In Search of Silence


Producer: Michael Schubert
In Search of Silence

Do you want to hear all about silence? Perhaps silence is simply the absence of sound. Not noise. But is that it? I’m on a quest in search of silence, to explore the views of those who work with sound, and those who deal with silence. The quest will take me to the quietest rooms and the noisiest streets, in search of silence.

I asked the experts, sat in silent rooms and explored a diversity of views. What I found was a range of definitions and a fascination amongst those who work with silence. From hearing and communication researchers to composers, musicians, sound recording engineers and naturalists and acoustic ecologists – they all had their point of view, their lens on silence.

The anechoic chamber, a silent room, rumoured to drive you crazy turned out to be serene, unusual and compelling. Hearing Researchers told me that we don’t hear sounds in our head at all, it’s all electrical currents. Not sound at all. Composers and sound recordists considered silence to be as important as sound. Conductors insist that musicians needed to learn how to play silence in order to create great performances.

I talked with Professor David McAlpine from the Australian Hearing Hub, a researcher who opened the door to the anechoic chamber, Richard Gill, composer, conductor and music educator who is currently exploring how to play silence, and Guntis Sics, who is always on film sets and finds his version of professional silence different to absolute silence.

Does silence exist? Would we want silence if we could actually find it? Will our brain allow silence to exist for us? These are some of the questions posed and answered as I go In Search of Silence.

Visit In Search of Silence for blog posts and interviews.

This piece was made for the CBAA National Features & Documentary Series 2016, a showcase of work by new and emerging Australian community radio producers, with training and mentoring provided by the Community and Media Training Organisation.

Hearing Colours Seeing Sounds


Producer: Michael Schubert
Hearing Colours Seeing Sounds : Lessons from Synaesthesia

We are used to hearing sounds and seeing colours, but what if you could hear colours or see sounds. Or what if you read a book and each letter had a colour. Dr Anina Rich researches synaesthesia with an aim to understand the associating functions in our everyday perception. Although unusual, synaesthesia is not a disorder; it can provide us with a unique view of the integration that underlies perception. Synaesthetics may just be the “pioneers of perception”.

FEATURED

aninarichAssociate Professor Anina Rich has two main streams of research. One explores the way in which the brain prioritises relevant information and ignores distraction – the mechanisms that allow us to pay attention. The other relates to the way the brain integrates information, both across the senses and within a single sense.

Synaesthesia, an unusual condition in which stimulation in one sensory modality generates an additional experience, provides a unique perspective of this integration. For example, in ‘sound-colour’ synaesthesia, a sound elicits a colour experience; in ‘grapheme-colour’ synaesthesia, letters, digits and words each generate particular involuntary colours. Although unusual, synaesthesia is not a disorder. She is currently conducting studies on grapheme-colour, sound-colour, and olfactory-colour synaesthesia.

LINKS

SYNAESTHESIA RESEARCH GROUP at Macquarie University
SYNAESTHESIA Participant Register

AUDIO

Alexandre Navarro, All Around
Mystery Mammal, Lonely Satellite


PAUL BOURKE LECTURE 2014

As part of receiving the prestigious Paul Bourke Award in 2013 from the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, on 1st May 2014 Associate Professor Rich discussed her research on synaesthesia and the mappings we all have between our senses, giving insights into the way the brain integrates information for conscious perception of the world.


McGurk EFFECT

If you haven’t seen it or you’ve seen it a hundred times, it still works.  The McGurk Effect demonstrates how we use visual information when we listen .. what we see … affects .. what we hear.


ORGANISATIONS

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CONFERENCE

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