Category Archives: Sport

hamstrings

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Eccentric Hamstrings, Big Sport
    and Pioneering Research Groups


Many of us have had a hamstring injury at one time or another – you know – that big muscle group at the back of the thigh.  Sportspeople are constantly injuring that muscle group at great cost to themselves and the team.  David Opar and his team research, collaborate and coordinate the new wave of inquiry into hamstring injury, rehabilitation and management.

FEATURED

Dr David Opar completed his doctoral thesis at the Queensland University of Technology [QUT] in the area of hamstring strain injuries. Soon after its completion he joined the Australian Catholic University [ACU] as a Lecturer in the School of Exercise Science.

David is part of the ACU High Performance Sport lecturing team and manages the ‘Performance and Injury: Prevention and Management’ unit. He also heads up the ACU Hamstring Injury Group and is leading the way in hamstring injury research. David and his team are in close consultation with professional sporting codes both nationally and internationally to deliver evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies for their athlete group.

AUDIO

David Krayb, 50 cm bag
Barcelona vs Real Madrid Messi injured 2017, excerpt.
Audioblocks licensed music.

PUBLICATIONS – PDF

Hamstring Strain Injuries: Factors that Lead to Injury and Re-Injury, in Sports Medicine.
Eccentric Hamstring Strength and Hamstring
Injury Risk in Australian Footballers, in Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise
Short biceps femoris fascicles and eccentric knee
flexor weakness increase the risk of hamstring
injury in elite football (soccer): a prospective
cohort study, in the British Medical Journal
Running exposure is associated with the risk of
hamstring strain injury in elite Australian footballers, in the British Medical Journal

YOUTUBE PRESENTATIONS

Hamstring Injuries in detail

Five years of Research in 25 minutes

LINKS

 

 

 


5RP University of Southern Queensland

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car
  • A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules.  Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories: Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner. You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research. It takes preparation and precision. You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own. In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics from the University of Southern Queensland present their current research.  Dr Adina Piovesana from the School of Psychology and Counselling has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.  Her talk is entitled “Buddy Franklin Tackles a Car”.  Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander from the School of Health and Wellbeing typically researches in the workplace and has a particular interest in fostering healthy behaviours in shift workers, which she considers in her talk “A Hard Days Night: Moving Shift Workers Towards Health”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Adina Piovesana

Dr Piovesana, a lecturer in ethics in psychology and psychological assessment, has been researching sports-related concussions to shine a spotlight on the serious cognitive and psychological effects they can have.

“Research has indicated that the force of a tackle is similar to hitting the windscreen of a car travelling at 40km per hour, so I thought that was an emotive and clear way to get the message across in my pitch.  While there are current protocols and tools used when dealing with concussions in sports, they aren’t sensitive enough to capture the cognitive and psychological effects concussions are having on players, and there is no consistency across the different sporting codes that I’ve been able to identify.  Unfortunately we don’t really know the long-term effects of concussions so we need to continue research that looks at it in more detail.  Adina will continue her research on psychometrics, test development and standardisation, and sports-related concussion.


 

 

 

 

Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander

Tracy is a senior lecturer at USQ’s School of Health and Wellbeing, her research is examining the effects shift work can have on the body, looking at the role of physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours on the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases such as heart disease.  “Shift workers are often time poor, have disruptive patterns and find it hard to fit in physical activity. My research is looking at ways to bring physical activity to shift workers with the hope they become more active, less fatigued, have an improved sense of wellbeing and most importantly a reduced risk of heart disease.”


CONGRATULATIONS

Dr Adina Piovesana and Dr Tracy Kolbe-Alexander have both returned with titles from the 5 Minute Research Pitch national final.  The researchers won their respective disciplines.  Southern Queensland University Executive Dean (Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts) Professor Barbara de la Harpe (middle) celebrates at the finals with the winners.

MORE CONGRATULATIONS

You may have noticed Adina has two trophies. She was voted the overall winner at the final in Melbourne. This gives the University of Southern Queensland the hosting rights for the 5 Minute Research Pitch 2018.

Here she receives the award from the Vice Chancellor of CQU, Professor Scott Bowman, who said he’d been impressed by the strong field of researchers.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

5RP Victoria University

 

 

 

  • Producer Michael Schubert
  • Right Place, Right Time, with the Right Eye Watching: Talent Identification and Recruitment in Team Sports.
  • Giving Voice to the Silent Game

 

 

 

 

THE 5 MINUTE RESEARCH PITCH

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the SoundMinds 5 Minute Research Pitch 2017 Finals Presentations. The 5 Minute Research Pitch is a competition for academics to present their research in 5 minutes. That’s it, they can use 3 slides – and there are no more rules. Pictured above are the 2017 finalists.

Researchers from 7 universities competed this year within their university in two categories:  Science& Health: and Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences.  The winner in each category heads off to the finals.

This year, the competition was hosted by Central Queensland University, because one of their researchers [Dr Melanie Hayman] was the 2016 overall winner.  You can hear more from Melanie in the SoundMinds episode Fit4Two where she discusses her innovative and entrepreneurial research about fitness during pregnancy.

The competition was held at the Central Quenland University campus in Melbourne, hosting the competitors from seven universities:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Australian Catholic University
  • Charles Sturt University
  • Southern Cross University
  • Southern Queensland University
  • University of Tasmania
  • Victoria University

It takes more than knowledge about your research.  It takes preparation and precision.  You are disqualified at 5:00 minutes and if the slides don’t work, you’re on your own.  In the world of academics, outside of publishing and taking the knowledge about our world forward, communication is essential, whether to colleagues, students, the public or potential funders.

“So often, this is what’s missing in research, passion for the project and the ability to explain it simply and effectively.”
Professor Scott Bowman (Vice Chancellor, Central Queensland University)


FEATURED

 

 

 

 

In this episode, two academics who research sport from different perspectives in the College of Sport & Exercise Science  at Victoria University. Dr Paul Larkin is interested in how talent is identified in early career sports people.  Dr Fiona McLachlan discusses the “silent game”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Paul Larkin

Talented sportspeople need to be spotted, identified, supported, trained and educated.  So how is this achieved?  Dr Paul Larkin’s research investigates the methods of spotting and recruitment.  Given the money invested at the leading edge of sport, you’d think it would be methodical, that “talent scouts” would have it down to a fine art or science.  You’d assume that they were finding the best of the best and that chance, personal bias and serendipity had no place in the process.  Well, think again, as you listen to “Right Place, Right Time, with the Right Eye Watching”.


 

 

 

 

Dr Fiona McLachlan

Fiona started exploring the historical and social perspectives of a sport that has one of the highest participation rates across all sports – netball.  What she found was very little, given the dominance of this sport in all parts of Australia.  There was little record of it’s existence compared to the minutiae of details, records and memorabilia from other notable Australian sports. She enlisted citizen researchers to fill the void as she coordinates the social history of netball in Victoria, in her talk, “Giving Voice to the Silent Game”.


AUDIO

Podington Bear, Floating in Space

 

 

 

Coaching the Coach

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Coaching the Coach

Scott Talpey moved from the US to Australia and discusses his dedication to working as an academic and informing the coaches of the other 99%, that is those who play sport at a non-elite level.  Scott’s early career as a strength and conditioning coach provided him with an understanding of the responsibilities and an insight into the needs of players and coaches.  He discusses the differences in cultural approaches to playing sport between the US and Australia and the role that club-based rather than school and college based participation leads to different outcomes.   The coach is seen as the key to changing the way we play and train for sport in Australia.

FEATURED

Dr Scott Talpey is a lecturer and researcher at Federation University Australia and a Research Associate at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) endorsed Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), at Federation University Australia.  His broad research area is in applied sport and exercise science with a specific focus on sports injury prevention and performance with an aim to have the sports coach and athlete as the end user of his research.

Scott is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) and a level II strength and conditioning coach from the Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA).  He currently practice as a strength and conditioning coach for semi professional adult and high performance junior basketball players. Scott uses his research background to inform his coaching, and his coaching experience to drive his research.

PUBLICATIONS

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Scott_Talpey/publications

AUDIO

Alex Fitch, We Call This Home III
Podington Bear, Bumble
Other licensed music from Audioblocks.

 

 

Hypermasculinity and Sports

 

 

 

  • Executive Producer: Dallas Rogers
  • Producer: Alejandra Villanueva
  • Hypermasculinity and Sports

We are used to seeing or playing sport without really thinking about the multiple sociocultural factors that take place in the game and on the field. Gina Krone delves into some of the most significant features of the most popular Australian sports. She analyses the concept of hypermasculinity looking at the physicality needed to practice AFL and Rugby, and how the body and minds of athletes have been portrayed and enacted according to different historical periods. In this episode we talk about the pedagogical strategies of the colonial project in Australia, and how globalised sports like Rugby are a useful case study to analyse issues such as masculinity, ethnicity and racism.

FEATURED

Alejandre Villanueva

SONY DSCAlejandra Villanueva is a Cultural Anthropologist, currently doing her PhD at the Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University.  She’s interested in the significance of sporting practices in contemporary societies, and how by looking at sports we can understand the processes of gender identity construction, socioeconomic inequalities and the social structures that shape the ways in which we understand work and leisure.

Gina Krone

Gina KroneGina Krone is a social researcher currently undertaking her PhD at RMIT exploring sport as cultural practice for diasporic Pasifika communities living in multicultural urban centres in Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand.

 

AUDIO

 

Feet First

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Feet First: A tale of science and serendipity

This is a story of science and serendipity, a researcher observing and listening, a story of research unfolding. Karen Mickle moved from researching changes in the feet of children, to older feet, studying falling injuries and ultimately developing exercises based on biomechanical principles. Karen’s research became practically driven as she listened to the reports of her participants, and her current focus is focused on improving the health and fitness of feet in a diabetic population.

FEATURED

Dr Karen Mickle is a postdkaren-mickleoctoral research fellow within the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL) at Victoria University. Her research is located in the Gait, Balance and Falls group within ISEAL’s Clinical Exercise Science Research program.

Karen is a biomechanist who gained her PhD in 2011 from the University of Wollongong and was awarded a prestigious postdoctoral training fellowship (2011-14) from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). Karen’s research for over a decade has focused on applied lower limb biomechanics with a specific interest in structure and function of the foot and the influence of musculoskeletal and metabolic pathologies.

During her NHMRC fellowship, Karen spent two years at the University of Salford, UK. Here she developed a reliable method to measure foot muscle morphology using ultrasound. Karen has published 20 original research articles and three book chapters. She has 40 conference papers at national and international scientific meetings, including the Clinical Biomechanics Award address at the 2009 International Society of Biomechanics Congress, and Invited Speaker presentations at the World Congress of Biomechanics in 2010 and 2014.

Her current research aims to determine the pathomechanics of muscle weakness in individuals who have foot problems, and to develop evidence-based intervention strategies to restore foot function in people with foot disorders [Media Release].

AUDIO

Kai Engel, Between Nothing and Everything
Fabrizio Paterlini, Profondo Blue
Podington Bear, Grebe

IMAGE

© Episode image, Saskia Schubert 2017 with permission

Fit4Two

 

 

 

  • Producer: Michael Schubert
  • Fit4Two: Pregnancy, Fitness & Entrepreneurial Research

Research is not a business. Think again, Dr Melanie Hayman has taken an entrepreneurial approach to researching fitness during pregnancy. It involves marketing strategies, a seven foot tall, hot pink, pregnant cardboard woman called Sophia and an innovative online program delivered via your GP or midwife.

FEATURED

Dr Melanie Hayman is a physical activity researcher based at Central Queensland University [CQU], Australia, where she is the Head of the Bachelor of Health Science course in the School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences.

Melanie’s research is focused on women’s health, more specifically the health and fitness during pregnancy, as well as the successful integration of e-Health and m-Health interventions into clinical care.

Melanie’s work culminated in an activity-during-pregnancy intervention project titled Fit4Two.  Melanie’s presentation at the 2016 5 Minute Research Pitch was so successful that she won both the sciences category and the overall best presentation.


FIT4TWO RESEARCH PROMOTION

PUBLICATIONS – PDF

An investigation into medical practitioners’ knowledge of
exercise during pregnancy guidelines, in the Australian Journal of Rural Health.
Confusion surrounds physical activity prescription
for pregnant women, in the Health Promotion Journal of Australia.
Regionally based medical practitioners may need support
when prescribing exercise to pregnant women, in the Australian Journal of Rural Health.
An investigation into the exercise behaviours of regionally based
Australian pregnant women, in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport.
Position Statement: Exercise in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period, Sports Medicine Australia

LINKS

Fit4Two

AUDIO

Will Bangs, I’m So Glad That You Exist
Jon Luc Hefferman, Triumph
Audioblocks royalty free stock music.